Siri Shortcuts on the Siri Watch Face

Session 217 WWDC 2018

Learn how to use Siri Shortcuts to bring glanceable information and custom interactions to the Siri watch face. Walk through how to create a compelling user experience by providing relevant shortcuts and by donating interactions from your app. See how these experiences can be created from both watchOS and iOS.

[ Music ]

[ Applause ]

Hi, everyone.

My name's Paul Salzman, and my friend Josh Ford and I are very excited to talk to you today about servicing your Siri shortcuts on the Siri watch face.

Last year, we released the Siri watch face, which has glanceable information and tappable actions, sorted by their relevance to the user, at every wrist raise.

That means our users have access to dynamically updated content, relevant to them throughout the day without any configuration required.

And now, in watchOS 5, we are very excited to add your applications as data sources to the Siri watch face.

The shortcuts you provide will show up on the watch face, on show up on the watch face, on these items that we call platters.

When the user taps on one of these platters, the underlying shortcut will be executed.

That can do something like launching into your application into a specific context, or if your shortcut supports background execution, we can run that inline on the watch face.

That means users can take advantage of your application's functionality without leaving their watch face.

So, let's take a look at what we're going to talk about today.

We're going to start off by going over how content appears on the Siri watch face.

After that, we'll talk about the Relevant Shortcut API, which is the API you use to provide content to the Siri watch face.

We'll also go over how you can use this API within your iOS application to provide content to the Siri watch face.

And then, I'm going to hand things over to Josh, who'll talk about our prediction engine, as well as give you insight as to how best to use these API's for your application.

So, let's talk about how content appears on the Siri watch face.

Everything on the Siri watch face is sorted by its relevance to the user.

The more relevant a piece of content is, the higher up on the content is, the higher up on the watch face it's going to appear.

And, we calculate relevance by incorporating a number of inputs across the system, like the current time of day, the user's location, their routine, and their engagement with a given data source.

You'll provide this content to us with a relevantShortcut, which associates a shortcut with UI customization, and the ability to give us hints as to when to deploy your content.

Now, we will derive implicit relevance for the shortcuts you provide based off of your user's past interaction with the shortcuts.

But, often you have much more insightful suggestions, especially when showing glanceable information, or if you want to suggest a shortcut that hasn't yet been executed by a user.

So, you can provide us things called relevance providers.

And, just like a first-party data source, users can disable or re-enable your data source in the Siri face customization page in the iOS Watch app.

Now, before we get too far into adopting the Relevant Shortcut API, we want to make sure we're not contending with these relevance calculations when we see how our relevant shortcuts behave and look on the watch face.

So, while we're developing, we're going to want to go into the iOS Settings app, into the Developer's page, and find the Shortcuts Testing section.

In there, we can ensure that our most recently provided relevant shortcuts show up at the top of the watch face, by enabling the Show Recent Shortcuts option.

Additionally, as we get further into adopting this API in our iOS application, we can cause the periodic syncing of relevant shortcuts from the iOS device to the watch to occur immediately by tapping the Force Sync Shortcuts to Watch button.

So, now let's talk about relevant shortcuts, and at the core of a relevant shortcut, is a shortcut.

Shortcuts encompass key functionality, within your application, that you want to make more accessible to your users.

And, they can access these shortcuts by saying key phrases into Siri, or tapping on various system UI.

And, in the case of watchOS, that's a platter on the Siri watch face.

There's a lot of in-depth discussion about how to make great shortcuts this year.

And all will give a high-level overview of how they work with a overview of how they work with a watchOS persecutive.

I highly recommend seeing the "Introduction to Siri Shortcuts" talk, and the "Building for Voice with Siri Shortcuts" that happened earlier in the conference.

So, shortcuts can be made out of one of two things.

An NSUserActivity, which represents a state within your application you want to accelerate users back into, or an intent, which can execute a task on your user's behalf.

Now, intents are really powerful, because they can support background execution, which means that users can take advantage of your functionality without having to launch your app into the foreground.

In fact, users can request background-capable intents that are available on their iPhone from their Apple watch or HomePod.

And, our frameworks provide a lot of built-in intents you can take advantage of right now, like sending a message, starting a workout, or requesting a ride.

But, new in watchOS 5, and iOS 12, you can make your own custom intents that have the functionality that your app does best.

There's this awesome in-depth intents definition file and editor built into Xcode.

And, I'll give you a couple of pointers related to relevant shortcuts.

But, I highly recommend seeing But, I highly recommend seeing those other talks for full details.

Now, let's go over a couple of examples of how shortcuts will execute when requested from a watch app.

User generates their shortcut request by tapping on the Siri watch face, or by saying a key voice phrase to Siri, and the watch receives that request.

It'll examine it and determine, is there an application that's installed that can handle the shortcut?

And, in this example, yes, there is one that's installed.

So, we're going to dispatch that shortcut to the appropriate application.

If your shortcut is implemented by an intent that can handle background execution, the application's intent execution will run that shortcut.

But, if instead your shortcut is built off of a NSUserActivity, or an intent that can't run in the background, the application itself will be launched to handle the shortcut.

When the shortcut execution is complete, a result will be generated, and then handed back to the user.

Now, let's take a look at another example.

In this case our user taps on the Siri watch face, or says a key phrase to Siri to generate the shortcut request.

And, the watch will examine it.

And, the watch will examine it.

And, in this case, it'll determine that there isn't an application that's installed that can handle the shortcut.

So, we'll check with the phone and see if it has an app that can handle the shortcut.

And, in this case, yes there is.

So, we're going to forward that request over to the phone.

And, the proper application, or intents extension will handle execution.

When execution is complete, a result will be generated on the phone, and forward back to the watch, and conveyed to the user.

So, now that we understand the key concepts that make up a shortcut, and how it'll execute on the watch, let's talk about relevant shortcuts, which take your shortcuts and show them on the watch face when they're most relevant.

We can automatically populate the fields on the platters on the Siri watch face, based on your shortcut content.

But, you can also customize the platter's display, which is really useful for displaying glanceable information.

And, of course when your platter is tapped, the underlying shortcut will be executed.

So, let's take a look at how this will run on this watch face.

If your shortcut is backed by a user activity, when the user taps on it, your app will be launched into the appropriate launched into the appropriate context.

If instead, your app is or, your shortcut is based off of intents, when the user taps on the platter, we'll see this intent confirmation view.

And, if they tap to confirm it, if your intent runs at the background, we'll execute it inline.

If instead your intent can't run in the background, we'll launch your application, and hand you the intent to continue execution.

So, let's look at the API for Relevant Shortcuts.

At the core of a relevant shortcut, of course, is a shortcut.

If you want to give us hints as to when this content is relevant, you can provide us relevanceProviders, which we'll go over soon.

And, if you want to customize the UI beyond what your shortcut will provide, you can give us a defaultCardTemplate on the watchTemplate property.

Now, once you're done creating all of your wonderful relevant shortcuts, you need to let us know about them.

So, you want to inform the default relevantShortcutStore.

And, the way you do that is providing an array.

And, every time you give us an array, it'll erase the previous contents we had in our shortcut store, which is really useful for invalidating stale relevant shortcuts.

But, you just need to keep in mind to provide us all of the mind to provide us all of the relevant shortcuts we should be considering.

So, let's look at how your content will display on the platter.

You can see on the top left, your application's icon will be displayed, followed by your app's name.

Below that is a required title string, and below that is an optional subtitle string, that you can use for more context.

We'll display that in italics.

To the left of both of these strings is an optional custom image.

This image supports transparency, and automatically applies rounded corners.

You can see more about the dimensions of these assets by looking at the human interface guidelines resources for watchOS.

Now, as I mentioned, we can automatically populate all these fields based off of the shortcuts you supply.

In the case of a custom intent, every parameter combination you supply has an associated title and subtitle we can use.

And, as you create your intents in code to generate a shortcut, you can set an image for any of the parameters.

We will choose an image for the custom image, based off of what is available on the most specific parameter.

And, the specificity of a parameter is defined by the order of parameters you have order of parameters you have listed in your intents definition file.

In the case of an NSUserActivity, when you're creating your userActivity to make a shortcut, you'll supply it userActivity type that you've listed in your app's info.plist.

And, for us to be able to display it without a default card template, you'll need to give us a title on the title property.

In iOS you can also supply a subtitle and a custom image by creating a CSSearchableItemAttributeSet.

And, on that attribute set, we'll extract a subtitle from the content description property, and the custom image from the thumbnailData property.

When you're done configuring this attribute set, set on your NSUserActivity's contentAttributeSet property.

If you don't want to give us the content that's baked into your shortcut, you can supply a default card template, which has properties for each of the fields on this platter.

And, depending on what we have available to us, we will display a different layout.

You can see in the right two configurations, that if no image is provided, we'll lay out the text further to the left, giving you more space for your words.

In the bottom two cases, if In the bottom two cases, if there's no subtitle, we'll allow the title string to wrap from the top line to the bottom line.

If your shortcut is based on an intent, when a user taps on it, they'll see this intent confirmation view.

In the top left is your application's icon, which is a bit bigger this time, followed by your app's name.

Below that we'll display the title and subtitle directly from your intents definition file.

And, at this point, the user has three options.

If they want to run your intent, they can click Confirm in that middle pink button.

If they don't want to run it, they can tap dismiss or the digital crown.

And then, the third option is a bit more subtle.

Sometimes users see an intent, realize they want to tweak some of the parameters.

So, they can tap that top module, and we'll launch into your application, and hand you the intent you've customized.

So, you can present some UI to allow your users to tweak some of the parameters before continuing execution.

Now, let's talk about that middle pink Confirm button a little bit more.

The string we show there, where it says Action Verb, is derived based off of the category of intent you've defined in your intent you've defined in your intents definition file.

Additionally, that color is chosen from your application's global tint color in your watch app storyboard.

Now, it's very important to keep in mind that the intents that you support in your watch app must be a subset of the intents you support in your iOS application.

That means you're going to be sharing the same title strings, and subtitle strings on iOS and watchOS.

And, watchOS is a very constrained canvas.

Every word counts.

So, we highly recommend using string dictionaries, with the NSStringVariableWidthRuleType key.

That allows you to give us a list of varying sizes of strings that we can choose from, depending on the context we're displaying them in.

When providing content to watchOS, we recommend supplying a string with a width rule of 20 for a 38 millimeter watch.

And, a width rule of 24 for a 42 millimeter watch.

To get more information on adopting this API, please see the "Localizing with Xcode 9" talk from last year's conference.

So now, let's talk about relevance providers.

Relevance providers are your way to give us a hint as to when we should show your content.

They really let us know how we should incorporate inputs like the time of day, the user's location, or their routine, when calculating relevance.

And, in fact, you can give more than one relevance provider on a given relevance shortcut.

And, we're going to take the inner section of their output.

So, if you give us a relevance provider that says a certain time of day's very important.

And, another one that says a specific location's important, you'll get high relevance output when both it is that time of day and the user is at that location.

If instead you want the union of these relevance providers, you're going to want to provide two separate relevance shortcuts, each one with a different relevance provider.

So, let's take a look at the options we have available.

The first one is INDateRelevanceProvider, which has a required startDate parameter, and an optional endDate parameter.

When you create an instance of this relevance provider, the closer time of day gets to the start that you've provided, the higher the relevance output of the provider.

After that time of day passes, the relevance will fall off on a curve, allowing more content to curve, allowing more content to appear on the top of the watch face.

And, if you give us this optional endDate, we'll adjust that curve to accommodate.

If your content instead is more relevant to a given location, you can use the INLocationRelevanceProvider.

It takes a CLRegion as its main parameter when you create an instance of this.

As the user gets closer and closer to that region, the relevance output of this relevanceProvider gets higher and higher.

Now, you don't always have a specific time of day, or location in mind, for where your content should be relevant.

User's schedules, their favorite locations vary all over the place, and you don't want to have to get in the business of tracking all of this.

So, you can take advantage of the Siri face's smarts, and use an INDailyRoutineRelevanceProvider, where we have situations for both time of days that might be favorite for your users, and location.

For instance, if you have some content you want to show as a daily forecast when your user wakes up, you don't want to have to know if they wake up at 5 A.M. or 10 A.M.

You should just give us the morning situation.

And, if you've got a workout you want to suggest that requires some gym equipment, you can pass us the gym situation.

us the gym situation.

So, now that we have all of this API in our toolbox, let's build a couple of relevant shortcuts.

In my examples we've got a hypothetical meal logging application that allows users to log their meals, and they can opt to do challenges.

This week's challenge, our users opted into a veggie challenge.

So, we're going to create a user activity for logging meals.

It's an activity type is com.myapp.LogMeal.

And, because we're going to be displaying this for the dinner meal, we're going to set the value for the meal key in our user info dictionary to Dinner.

Once we have our userActivity set up, we can create a shortcut, and from that shortcut, we can create a relevantShortcut.

Now, we want to really let our users know that this is showing up on the watch face, because they've opted into the veggie challenge.

So, we're going to create a default card template to customize their UI with Log Dinner as our title.

And, we're going to convey the veggie challenge in our subtitle and our custom image.

Now, our users haven't always been necessarily logging their dinners, but they've opted into this challenge.

So, we want to give the system a So, we want to give the system a hint that this should be displayed in the evening by passing a dailyRoutineRelevanceProvider with the situation .evening.

And now that our relevantShortcut is configured, we can pass it along to the default relevantShortcutStore.

For our next example, in our application, users also have a bunch of favorites they can configure for snacks they eat often, or perhaps a breakfast they had every day.

So, we've created a logFavoriteMealIntent.

We want a couple of these to surface on the watch face to make it even easier for our users to log their favorite snacks and meals.

So, we'll create an instance of our intent, and take one of our favorites, and set it on the favorites parameter.

In this case, our user likes to eat cookies.

We'll also set an image for that parameter, so that when it shows up on the watch face, they get a little bit more context about what they're about to log.

From here, we can take our intent and create a shortcut, and from our shortcut, create a relevantShortcut.

At this point, we're ready to pass along our relevantShortcut to the relevant shortcut store.

We don't need a default card template, because the title strings and image, the image that we pass along to our intent, should be sufficient.

intent, should be sufficient.

We also don't really want to provide a relevanceProvider here.

Because this is something habitual for our users.

They log these often throughout the day, and we can take advantage of the Siri face's prediction engine to show it when it most matters to our users.

And, once we're done creating our relevantShortcuts, we're not done here actually.

We need to be able to handle them as well.

And, new in watchOS 5 is a method on your WKExtensionDelegate called handle user shortcut.

And, our first example, if the user taps on that Siri platter, our application will be launched, and we'll be handed a user activity to this method, whose activity type matches com.myapp.LogMeal.

At this point, we want to make sure we go into the right part of our application.

So, we'll jump up to the rootInterfaceController, and push on our logMealInterfaceController.

We've got to be sure to pass along that context we put into our user info dictionary, so we know which meal we're about to be logging.

For our second example, the common case will be that that background-capable intent will execute successfully in our intents extension.

But, there are a couple instances where our application instances where our application will get a callback directly.

The first one being if there's an error during execution, and we say we need to handle this within our app.

The other one, though, might happen if the user wants to tweak a couple of the parameters.

For instance, they see that they're about to log a cookie, when they really know they just ate 5.

So, we'll tap on the top module, we'll launch into your application, and you'll get a callback here.

The userActivity you'll receive will have an activity type equal to the name of the class of intent you gave us.

At this point, you can extract an interaction off of userActivity, and an intent off of that interaction, which will have all the parameters you set when you created your relevantShortcut.

So, now we're ready to create relevant shortcuts whenever our application has runtime.

But, it's very important to note, that just because your content is showing up on the Siri watch face, doesn't mean your application is actively running.

So, to help you get more runtime to provide relative shortcuts, we've created the WKRelevantShortcutRefresh BackgroundTask.

We'll be handing this out to applications that are providing awesome relevant shortcuts that our users are spending time looking at, tapping through, but looking at, tapping through, but not scrolling past.

When you get one of these refresh background tasks, it's your opportunity to update the data that supplies your relevant shortcuts, and give us a fresh set of relevant shortcuts.

And, on a related note, if your background-capable intent executes, it's inside of your intents extension.

That means that if you update your data store, it's possible that your UI and your application has become stale.

So, in watchOS 5, we've also created the WKIntentDidRunRefresh BackgroundTask.

And, we'll hand that to you with some runtime when your intents extension completes a execution of a shortcut.

That is your opportunity to make sure that your UI's up to date, perhaps request an updated snapshot, or reload, or extend your complication timeline.

So, let's talk about how we can take advantage of these API's on iOS.

And, the great news is, with the exception of those WKRefreshBackgroundTasks, we can use all of the same exact API's in our iOS application.

The relevant shortcuts we provide in our iOS app will be periodically synced from the phone to the watch.

And, merged in with local, relevant shortcuts for consideration to be displayed on the watch face.

You have all of the same UI customization options available.

The only difference is if your relevant shortcut will execute back on the phone, we'll show your iOS application's icon instead of your watchOS applications icon.

And now that we can be showing relevant shortcuts that will execute on the phone or the watch, let's talk about where they will execute when the user taps on them.

If a relevant shortcut can be handled by an application that's installed locally on your watch, regardless of where it came from, we're going to execute it in the watchOS application.

That gives the user the best experience and the lowest latency.

You can ensure that your watchOS application supports execution of a shortcut by making sure the user activity's activityType is in your info.plist, NSUserActivityTyped array.

Or, if it's an intent, that your intent is listed in your intents extension.

If instead there is no application installed that can handle your shortcut, except on handle your shortcut, except on iOS, we'll execute it back on the phone, even if your phone isn't near the user.

Now, because we can be executing content back on the phone, we want to make sure that users don't tap on a platter, and then are immediately told to go find their phone.

So, we have a couple of rules about the type of shortcuts that will execute back on the phone that we're willing to surface.

Requirements are that they're intent-based.

They handle background execution.

And, they don't require access to protected data.

And, that's the data that you keep encrypted when the phone is locked.

The way you can ensure that your content meets these requirements is by taking a look at the parameter combination in your custom intent, and ensuring that background execution is supported.

And, looking at your overall custom intent and seeing if you have any authentication restrictions you've applied.

There are three options here, and we support the first two.

The first one is that there are no restrictions.

The second one says that you are restricted while the device is locked, which means that at least the watch has to be unlocked for us to execute.

And the final one is Restricted While Locked, or Protected Data is Unavailable.

is Unavailable.

Now that you have all this information you're ready to build some awesome shortcuts from both the watch and the phone.

So, I'd like to hand things over to Josh to talk a little bit more about our prediction engine.

Thank you.

[ Applause ]

Thank you, Paul.

Good morning.

My name is Josh, and I am an engineer on the watchOS team.

And, we're really excited to see the kinds of relevant shortcuts that you can surface on the Siri watch face.

So, Paul just walked you through some of the API's and different ways that you can provide your relevant shortcuts to the system.

Now, I want to talk about how the system predicts your relevant shortcuts, and the things that you can do to ensure the system surfaces your content when it's most appropriate to the user.

It's like Paul talked about earlier, content on the Siri watch face is ordered by relevance to the user.

At a wrist raise, we want to be surfacing the content the user cares about most.

Whether that be based on the current time, location, or other current time, location, or other factors from across the system.

And, to figure out what content the user cares about, we're looking at how they interact with the different platters on the Siri watch face.

What things are they tapping on?

What things are they spending a lot of time looking at?

And, what things are they scrolling past to find other content?

And, we use all this information to understand what are the different platters that the user wants to see right on a wrist raise.

And so, because we're trying to surface, again, the content the user cares about most, you want to make sure that you're providing relevant, engaging content to be surfaced on the Siri watch face.

So, let's talk a little bit more about how we actually put your relevant shortcuts on the Siri watch face.

So, like Paul mentioned earlier, the first step is you need to provide your relevant shortcuts to the system, into the defaultRelevantShortcutsStore.

Once you've provided your relevant shortcuts, we can run them through our machine learning model to figure out what is the best way to be what is the best way to be surfacing your relevant shortcuts to the user.

So, let's look at what we take into account inside of this model.

So, the first thing that we look at is your relevance providers.

This is your way to provide additional context to the system that we wouldn't otherwise have.

This might be a concrete time, location, or other context.

We also look at past behavior.

So, how has the user interacted with this relevant shortcut before?

Is it something they're spending a lot of time tapping on and looking at on the watch face?

Or, something that they're scrolling past to find something more interesting?

We also look at a number of different factors from across the system, such as, you know, the current time, current day of the week, current location, user's routine, among a number of other factors.

And, take all this into account to try to better understand what is the context under which the user wants to interact with the particular shortcut.

And, it's also worth noting that this model is secure and personalized to each user.

personalized to each user.

All of our learning happens on-device, and we're building a model for each and every single user of the Siri watch face.

The way that you interact with the watch face may be different from the way that I interact with the watch.

And, once we have this model trained we can then take your relevant shortcuts, and again, surface them on the Siri watch face based on their relevance to the user.

If you attended some of the previous shortcut talks, you may have heard about donations.

This is your way to indicate to the system what the user's doing within your app.

And, although they don't actually surface within the UI of the Siri watch face, we take them into account when trying to understand the user's past behavior.

So, again, donations are your way to indicate important tasks, or other information about what users are doing inside of your applications, and providing that to the system.

And, by giving this information And, by giving this information to the system, we can understand and learn patterns in the user's behavior.

So, if the user, for example, is looking or performing the same action at the same time every single day, or around similar locations, the system can pick up on these patterns, and again, surface the relevant shortcuts when they're appropriate to your users.

So, if you're using NSUserActivities to represent your donations, there's a few things you need to do to be able to provide those donations to the system.

The first is you need to set both these properties to "true" in your NSUserActivity, the eligibleForPrediction and eligibleForSearch.

Next, you need to make sure that your user activity is supported by an application, by indicating that within your info.plist.

And, finally you want to make sure that you're donating these user activities whenever this piece of content is visible to the user, so the system can start to pick up on the patterns.

And so, to provide that donation, there's a method on NSUserActivity, becomeCurrent, that allows you to donate to the system.

New in watchOS 5, though, there is this method updateUserActivity on WKInterfaceController, where you can attach your user activity to an interfaceController, and whenever this interfaceController's visible to the user, the system will automatically be donating the user activities on your behalf.

This is similar to the API's that we have over on iOS, on UIViewController, and UIResponder, where you can, kind of, attach an NSUserActivity to a piece of your UI.

And so now, this is the recommended way to be providing NSUserActivity donations on watchOS.

If your shortcuts are backed by an intent, you can provide those intent donations by using the INInteraction API.

So, if you attended any of the previous shortcut talks, this probably looks familiar to you.

But, to provide this donation, first you create your intent, and adjust any parameters as they're necessary for what the user just did within your app.

Next, you create your INInteraction with intent, and call the donate method when call the donate method when users perform this particular interaction.

The other thing to look out for, is this primary shortcut type for when we're making watchOS predictions.

And so, let's take a look at this.

Inside of the Xcode intents editor, you'll notice that there's a field to select the primary shortcut type.

So, this allows you to indicate to the system, like, kind of, the most critical use cases for your app.

And so, let's talk more about what that means.

So, by indicating the primary shortcut type, you're, kind of, telling the system what are the use cases that you think your users care about most.

And, this helps us expedite our learning process.

You can indicate one of these per intent that you've defined.

And, for the best performance, the parameter combination, the selection, have a subset of the parameters that you're providing in your relevant shortcuts.

And, we'll walk through a couple of examples to try to better understand what that means.

But, by giving this information to the system, we can much more to the system, we can much more quickly pick up on patterns in the user behavior, and much more quickly understand what are the relevant shortcuts that the user cares about most.

So, first up, we have this Messaging app.

And so, this is something that Paul and I have been using for a while now, so every morning we're sending messages back and forth.

Sometimes it's in preparation for this talk, and other times it's about what cookies we want to get at lunch.

And so, this app has gone ahead and adopted Siri shortcuts.

And, they defined a couple different parameters that their app supports.

So, the first one is the recipient.

So, who am I sending a message to?

And, the second one is the message.

So, what is the content of the message I'm trying to send?

So, like I mentioned before, right, Paul and I are using this app every single morning, but the actual content of the messages that we're sending varies from day to day.

So, because of this, this may not make a good candidate for the primary shortcut type.

It's going to take a lot longer before the system can, kind of, understand what are the shortcuts I'm trying to perform.

Whereas, Paul and I are having Whereas, Paul and I are having very consistent conversations, so the system can really quickly pick up on this pattern, that every morning, I'm sending messages to Paul.

Another little more interesting example, is this app that I use to order my morning coffee.

And again, this app has gone and adopted Siri shortcuts.

So, they support a couple different parameters.

The first one is the type of coffee I want to buy.

The next one is the condiments, so do I want cream or sugar?

And, finally, the location that I want to pick my coffee up from.

So, every morning I use this app and go place an order for my morning coffee.

But, depending on where I have a meeting, the location that I want to pick my coffee up from will change from day to day.

Maybe I'm going to Infinite Loop, or Apple Park, or up to San Francisco, and I want to pick up my coffee at, you know, the closest store.

So, again, because there's a lot of variability in the location, this may not make a good candidate for the primary shortcut type.

It's going to take a lot longer for the system to, kind of, understand the patterns in my behavior.

Whereas, the actual order that I place is the same thing every single time.

I always order a latte with the same amount of cream and same amount of sugar.

So, this does make a really great candidate for the primary shortcut type.

And, coffee it's on its own, might be too generic, right?

The coffee plus the condiment might make a better primary shortcut type.

And so, that is how you can provide information from within your apps about what users are doing.

So, now let's talk about how we predict your relevant shortcuts.

And, to talk about this, we have a couple different apps that we're going to be looking at.

The first one is this recipes app.

And so, this is an app that I use every single day that provides me suggestions for recipes that I might want to try.

Next, we have this fitness trainer app that provides me a nice reminder to go out and do my evening run.

And finally, there's this travel guide app that tries to surface interesting locations of interest while I'm out and about so I can make sure to go check them out.

And so, each of these three different apps falls into one of these, kind of, three different categories that we have.

The first one is what we call "Downtime."

And so, this is something that doesn't have a concrete time or location associated with it.

When I want to interact with this recipes app may vary from when you want to interact with this particular app.

Whereas, this fitness trainer app has a very concrete time associated with it, right?

I've gone and configured that 8 P.M. is the perfect time to be surfacing this reminder to me.

And, by giving this information to the system, we can much more accurately rank this particular relevant shortcut against everything else that we have to consider.

Similarly, this travel guide app knows where they want to be surfacing their particular relevant shortcuts, right?

They know all the locations of interest, in this case, Golden Gate Park.

And again, by passing that information to the system, we can much more accurately predict the relevance of this particular shortcut.

And, to provide this additional context to the system, whether context to the system, whether that be a concrete time, location, or other information, you can provide that through the relevanceProvider API.

And so, this allows you to indicate hints to the system at when your content is most important to your users.

It also allows you to surface new content that users may not have seen before.

Since you're providing this additional hints to the system, we don't need to have seen as much of the user's past behavior and consistency before the system becomes confident that this is something the user cares about.

But, it's also important to keep in mind that user engagement is taken into account at every step of the process.

If you provide relevance providers or not, we want to make sure that the content that we're surfacing is stuff that the user cares about.

So, let's take another look at this recipes app.

So, like what we talked about earlier, there's not really a concrete time or location associated with it, right?

The time that I want to interact with this app may be for cooking with this app may be for cooking dinner, whereas for you it might be for cooking lunch.

And so, in this case, we may actually indicate an empty set of relevanceProviders.

And, in this case, the system will determine the relevance of this particular shortcut based on how the user's interacted with it before.

So, for me, I always use this around 7 P.M. because that's when I go cook dinner, so that's when the system will start to surface this particular relevant shortcut.

If we take a look, however, at this fitness trainer app, which does have a concrete time associated with it, you can provide that by creating a dateRelevanceProvider, and in this case providing the 8 P.M.

start time.

And, by giving this information to the system, we will surface this content around a specific time of day.

And, as you move closer and closer and closer to 8 P.M., this content becomes more and more relevant to the user.

So, let's look at what that.

So, here's a couple cards that I So, here's a couple cards that I might have on my Siri watch face.

The first is a reminder from Calendar for a prep meeting for this talk.

Next, is an app that I use that gives me interesting tidbits of space news.

And finally, we have this fitness trainer app, so let's focus in on that.

So, I just woke up, I'm getting ready for my day.

You know, it's, kind of, 8 A.M.

And so, you can see that this fitness trainer app is actually already starting to surface on the Siri watch face.

We want to make sure that users are, kind of, aware of all the things they have going on during the course of the day, but it's kind of placed much lower on the face.

It's not the most pressing thing to the user right now.

But, as we start moving throughout the day, right, that calendar event that I had is no longer relevant to me.

And so, this fitness trainer suggestion will start to bubble up the face, right?

We're getting closer and closer to 8 P.M. This content is becoming more important to me.

And, once we finally reach 8 P.M., right, this is the most important thing to me right now.

Want to make sure I don't forget to go for my run.

to go for my run.

So, it'd be surfaced up at the top of the Siri watch face.

Now, let's take a look at the travel guide app, which again is trying to surface content around interesting locations of interest the user.

And, as you may have guessed, you can provide this information to the system using a locationRelevanceProvider.

In this case, near Golden Gate Park.

And, by providing this information to the system, we will automatically be surfacing this content when the user starts getting close to Golden Gate Park.

And, again, as the user gets closer and closer and closer to Golden Gate Park, this content becomes more relevant to them.

So, if I just arrive up in San Francisco, you can see that we're already starting to surface this suggestion to go check out Golden Gate Park.

It's displayed lower on the face, because it's not the most pressing thing to me right now.

But, we want to make sure that the user is aware about this.

And, as I move closer and closer to Golden Gate Park, this content becomes more relevant to content becomes more relevant to me, until I've finally arrived, and I can really easily tap on this to dive into more details, and check out what are the things I can do while I'm at Golden Gate Park.

When you're creating your locationRelevanceProviders, you provide to the system a CLRegion.

And so, this allows you to indicate two important properties.

The first is the actual coordinates, the lat, long that you're interested in surfacing your content, along with the radius.

So, how close does the user need to be before this content is relevant to them?

There's also a couple properties in CLRegion that you can use to, kind of, adjust how the system interprets your region.

The first one is notifyOnEntry.

So, as the name might suggest, the system waits until the user has entered into this region before this piece of content becomes relevant to the user.

Similarly, there's a notifyOnExit property that you can set, where the system will wait until the user has left this particular region before this content becomes relevant.

We actually use both these two We actually use both these two properties with the existing location based reminders on the Siri watch face, to get, kind of, a geofencing-like behavior.

By default on CLRegion, both these properties are set to "true."

And, in that case, we'll smoothly interpolate the relevance based on how close the user is to a particular location.

And so, creating your CLRegion is really easy.

In this example, we're creating one around Apple Park, so I've brought in the coordinates for Apple Park, along with the radius.

So, how close do I need to be?

In this case, 2 kilometers.

Next, I will go adjust the notifyOnEntry, notifyOnExit properties as they make sense for my use case.

And, once I have my region fully configured, I can really easily create a locationRelevanceProvider.

A couple of quick notes about the locationRelevanceProvider.

In order to use it, your app needs location authorization, otherwise we're going to ignore this particular locationRelevanceProvider.

locationRelevanceProvider.

And, to preserve user battery life, the number of location updates we get during the course of an hour is limited, so keep that in mind.

So, that's some of the ways that you can provide concrete times and locations to the system.

Now, let's talk about what you can do to try to provide personalization.

So, we have this dailyRoutineRelevanceProvider.

And so, like Paul mentioned earlier, this allows you to surface content at meaningful times or locations to the user.

And, these times and locations are personalized to each and every single user of the Siri watch face.

So, the first situation that we'll talk about is the morning situation.

This allows you to surface content right when the user wakes up in the morning.

We actually already used this for the existing first-party weather data source on the Siri watch face, so we can provide the user a nice summary of the forecast at the beginning of the day, and it quickly dismisses, making room for other content they might be interested in.

they might be interested in.

We also have an evening situation.

And so, this allows us to surface content before the user goes to bed.

So, we use this one for the new heart rate card in watchOS 5, so that we can provide the user a summary of their heart rate activity throughout the day.

And, creating a dailyRoutineRelevanceProvider is really easy.

You've just got to specify which situation you're interested in.

So, in this case, we can really easily create a dailyRoutineRelevanceProvider to surface content right when the user wakes up.

And, the behavior for both these two situations is very similar to a dateLocation or a dateRelevanceProvider.

Except that the system is automatically figuring out what are the dates that we should be surfacing this content.

We also have a few situations available to you that allow you to surface content in meaningful locations to the user, whether that be home, work, school, or when the user arrives to the gym.

And again, creating one of these dailyRoutineRelevanceProviders is really easy.

You just need to specify which situation you're interested in.

And, for all of these situations, the behavior of this relevanceProvider is similar again to a locationRelevanceProvider, except that the system is automatically figuring out the locations on your behalf.

And so, as the user gets closer to these locations, your content will become more relevant to your users.

So, that is some of the insight into how we predict your relevant shortcuts on the Siri watch face.

And, some of the things that you can do to provide additional context to the system so that we can surface your content when it's most appropriate.

Now, let's talk about how you can build a great experience on the Siri watch face.

So, we've been working on the Siri watch face for a while now.

And, we've learned quite a few things along the way.

First one of those things is there's kind of, two high-level categories of content that we think works great on the Siri watch face.

The first one of those is The first one of those is glanceable information.

So, being able to really easily, on a wrist raise, get a snippet of information that I care about, and being able to tap on it when it's appropriate to dive into more details.

The second is tappable actions.

So, being able to really easily, from my watch face, tap on a platter, execute a complex action, and get right back to my day.

So, let's take a look at the glanceable information.

So, you can see we have this recipes app again.

And, throughout the day, when I'm glancing at my wrist, I can get a nice snippet of information, right?

I can see the recipe that I might be cooking later today.

And, I can really easily decide is this something I want to make, or do I want to go out tonight?

And, when I'm getting ready to go home in the evening, I can really easily tap on it to dive into this app and see, do I need to stop at the grocery store on my way home?

So, if you're trying to provide glanceable information to the user, there's a few things that you want to keep in mind.

Make sure that you're surfacing Make sure that you're surfacing the most critical information in your relevant shortcuts.

This is the content that users are going to see at a wrist raise throughout the day, and this is the content that they really want to see right on their watch face.

When the user taps on your relevant shortcut, it should be opening up into a location within your app, and providing them additional details.

Accidental taps on the Siri watch face do happen, and so, you want to make sure you're not kicking off any long-running background task that the user isn't aware of.

And, like Paul mentioned earlier, the system will automatically be giving you an additional background refresh task to go provide new content.

Take advantage of this, so you make sure you have relevant and interesting content available on the Siri watch face.

And, whenever you get new data, whether that be through this background refresh task, because you've gone to the network and downloaded new data, or because the user has started using your app, make sure that you provide new relevant shortcuts the system can always be surfacing the most interesting content to the user right on a wrist raise.

And finally, if the information that you're trying to surface is timely, indicate that to us through the relevance providers, so the system can surface your content, again, when it's most appropriate.

And so, that is glanceable information.

Now, let's talk a little bit about tappable actions on the Siri watch face.

So, you can see we have this fitness trainer app again.

And, I can really easily, right on my wrist, get this reminder that I need to go out for my run.

And tapping on it, I get this nice confirmation to make sure that this is the actual action that I want to execute.

And, in two taps, I can start this workout.

I don't need to spend time digging through apps to find this particular fitness trainer app, and start kick off my workout.

I can really easily in two taps, right from my watch face, kick off this workout.

So, if you're providing tappable actions, a few things to keep in mind.

mind.

Your intents are running within your Siri extension.

And, this allows the system to automatically run your intents in the background, so the user never has to leave the Siri watch face to go run your actions.

We always display the standard system confirmation UI, so that users know the action they're going to run, and we can make sure this is what they want to perform.

You also want to make sure that the relevant shortcuts that you're creating are fully specified, so that your intents extension can handle them without any additional user confirmation.

So that when the user taps on one of these relevant shortcuts on the Siri watch face, we don't need to open up your app to continue and get, you know, additional information from the user.

We can kick off your SiriKit extension, run it in the background, and the user can get on with their day.

And, you want to be providing commonly used tasks within your app as relevant shortcuts.

These are the kind of tasks that These are the kind of tasks that users are using your apps a lot for, and that they want to have really quick and easy access to from the watch face.

And, you also want to make sure that you're providing relevant shortcuts often.

You may not know the last time that you provided relevant shortcuts to the system is, and you want to make sure that your users can always access your actions right from the Siri watch face.

If you're going to be providing these when your app starts up, do it on a background thread so you're not slowing down your app launch.

So, we've talked a lot about relevant shortcuts, and the ways that you can surface your information and actions right on the Siri watch face.

You want to make sure that you're also providing relevant and engaging content.

This is the kind of content that users want to see right on a wrist raise, and the kind of content that we are surfacing on the Siri watch face, and trying to promote to the top.

The richest experience happens when you have a watchOS app.

This is when the system can give you additional background you additional background refresh tasks, and there's no latency between the user tapping on one of the relevant shortcuts, and us beginning execution.

If you have any questions, we have a lab later today.

We would love to talk to you guys about relevant shortcuts and the Siri watch face.

And, we're really excited to see the kinds of experiences that you guys can create right on the watch face.

Thank you.

[ Applause ]

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